How Can Child Care Centers Get Parents Involved In Kids' Learning

Modern-day parents are more involved and committed to their child’s development than before. However, their active involvement only starts after preschool.

Due to work-related commitments and busy schedules, most parents send their kids to school and pick them up later. The child’s care center teachers take over and facilitate age-appropriate lessons and activities. These parents forget that it’s at this stage that their kids need their presence and engagement with anything they do. 


Research suggests that kids with parents who are actively involved in their education are more engaged in school work. They also stay longer in school and exhibit commendable learning outcomes. All these translate into better and longer-term social and economic benefits


If parents want their kids to benefit most from early education, they must change their view of parental involvement. They can’t just leave most of the work to the teachers. Instead, they need to find ways to support their kids while at the center. The center should also allow these parents to participate in school activities. 


The Importance of Parents’ Involvement 


A child’s most crucial cognitive development occurs when they’re in preschool. If these kids see and feel that their parents support them, they’re more likely to reach their full potential. Their parents’ involvement can also bring the learning process beyond the corners of the classrooms, creating a more positive experience for the child. Consequently, these experiences can help the preschooler perform better. 


Parents should also start the preschool learning process at home. If they’re well aware of their kids’ activities inside the daycare center, they can seamlessly link what their kids learn at school and at home. For example, the child care center teacher taught the kids a story highlighting the value of honesty. Parents should also reinforce these values to facilitate continued learning. 


The Parents’ Role in Early Childhood Development 


Parents’ involvement in early education can extend the child’s experiences in the classroom into the real world. Parents can guide their kids on the practical applications of information learned in school. For instance, parents can subscribe to getting a box of monthly puzzles and play them with their kids. 


The parent can help their child make more sense of these puzzles and relate them to real-life concepts. These puzzles can improve mental flexibility. On top of that, it can increase dopamine levels in the brain. This mood-regulating neurotransmitter also enhances concentration and memory. 


Parents who know what their kids are doing in school have a better sense of their core competencies and weaknesses. 


How Can Preschool Centers Move Parents to Get Involved


The joint efforts of both parents and schools can yield the most beneficial outcomes for the students. Here are some ways schools and teachers can forge better partnerships with parents:

  • The school should invite the parents and introduce themselves and their staff. It’s also best that the parents know how the school operates.
  • It’s also an excellent idea for the teachers and parents to be comfortable with each other. It will be easier to discuss the child’s performance and development through this. 
  • The teachers should also encourage parents to join class activities like career day, art exhibits, or storytelling. 
  • The school can also solicit ideas from the parents as to topics they could incorporate into the curriculum.

Collaboration Is the Key 


As the saying goes, it takes a whole village to raise a child. This is also true when it comes to educating them. Learning doesn’t stop within the four corners of the classroom. It’s why parents should work hand in hand with educators to raise good students and responsible citizens. 


Whether you’re part of a child care center or a parent, it’s best to collaborate with all stakeholders to improve children’s competencies.

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